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Welcome to Lamont's Anime Pages!

Anime? What's that?

Copyrights...

Anime (also known as Japanimation) is animation from Japanese studios. Unlike American animation (which is generally assumed to be for children,and dumbed down accordingly), the Japanese take their animation very seriously. The best of the genre includes works capable of standing comparison with many "live action" films without apologies.

If you're picturing Saturday morning cartoons at this point, guess again. The animation quality is frequently very high and stories often deal with adult (not to be confused with "adult-oriented") themes. And then there's the humor, which can sometimes only be described as inspired looniness. (Does a series about an android with a cat's brain sound off the wall to you? Trust me, you have to see it to believe it.)

Most (but not all) anime is derived from manga (Japanese graphic novels). These novels are serialized in weekly collections, often as thick as a large phone book, which sell in the millions in Japan. The more popular stories end up being printed as one or more paperback graphic novels, and can run to thirty volumes (and thousands of pages) or more.

In some cases the anime adaptation of a manga (such as Johji Manabe's Autoranda-zu, available in English in the United States under the name Outlanders) is heavily abbreviated (in the case of Outlanders from over a thousand pages to one 45-minute video). In other cases, a popular manga may appear as a series of episodes made directly for video or even as a television series of 20 or more episodes.

The artwork in Japanese anime is often superb in its own right, especially the character designs. For some samples, take a look at our Cel Gallery.

Anime comes in one of three forms:

What's here: Obviously I haven't included every anime ever made (as far as I know, there is no such listing), or even what's currently available. These selections are my own favorites, and the ones I'd recommend to someone just getting into anime or looking for new areas to explore. The anime titles you'll find at your corner video rental store or sales outlet are a miniscule sampling of what's actually available, and usually emphasize what U.S. distributors think American audiences want to watch, particularly teenage males. In reality, the variety of anime genres and titles is easily equal to that of Hollywood's output, ranging from preschool children's titles to concoctions that could only have emerged from a very sick mind. (Yep, just like Hollywood). To find titles that appeal to you may require hunting around a bit. The results are worth it, though.

Ratings on this site reflect my own opinions only, and range from one (poor) to four (top notch) stars, although I haven't bothered to include anything below two. In most cases titles are available dubbed into English or in Japanese with English subtitles; I've tried to point out any titles where this isn't the case.

Copyrights

Project A-Ko Copyright Soeishinsa/Final-Nishijima/Pony Canyon. Released in the United States through U.S. Manga Corps * Oh, My Goddess! Copyright Kosuke Fujishima/Kodansha/TBS/SS Films. Released in North America through AnimEigo * Tenchi Muyo! Copyright A.I.C./Pioneer LDC * All-Purpose Cultural Cat Girl Nuku Nuku (Bannou Bunka Nekomusume) Copyright Movic/King Records/Yuzo Takada/Futabasha. Released in North America by A.D. Vision * Iria: Zeiram the Animation Copyright Crowd/Bandai Visual/Mitsubishi Corporation/Banpresto. Released in the United States through U.S. Manga Corps * Dominion: Tank Police Copyright Masamune Shirow/Seishinsha/Plex. Exclusively licensed in the United States & Canada by Manga Entertainment * Ranma 1/2 Copyright Rumiko Takahashi/Shogakukan, Inc./Kitty/Fuji TV * RANMA 1/2 is a trademark of Viz Communications, Inc.
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This page last updated 2/5/2010.